dene-a-journey-S01EP5-featured

Denendeh – My Homeland

Roles are reversed when the filmmakers of Dene A Journey, Amos Scott and Riel Stevenson‐Burke become the main characters of this introspective episode. As the two embark on a mission to master their storytelling skills throughout this documentary, more plays out than they expected and their own story takes shape. These Dene Northerners deepen their personal connection to the land, and to their culture.

EPISODE 5

Denendeh – My Homeland

Roles are reversed when the filmmakers of Dene A Journey, Amos Scott and Riel Stevenson‐Burke become the main characters of this introspective episode. As the two embark on a mission to master their storytelling skills throughout this documentary, more plays out than they expected and their own story takes shape. These Dene Northerners deepen their personal connection to the land, and to their culture.

“I still feel I don’t know my own cultural background, but just being around other Dene and seeing how they survive on the land and pass on their traditions, I just gained a lot of cultural knowledge working with Dene A Journey.”

- Riel Stevenson-Burke

Denendeh

The Dene people commonly refer to the Northwest Territories as ‘Denendeh’, meaning “our land”. In Denendeh: Our Homeland, we turn the cameras around and introduce the shows creators, Amos Scott and Riel Stevenson-­Burke. Amos is of Tlicho heritage. The Tlicho are a Dene First Nations people, also known as Dogrib. Amos’ mom is originally from Behchoko, located about two and a half hours West of Yellowknife, and his family also spent time living in Fort Simpson. The Tlicho are self-­governing and include the communities of Behchoko, Gameti, Wekweeti and Whati. Riel is of Cree, Chipewyan and Mohawk heritage. The Cree people span across Canada from Alberta to Quebec. The Mohawk people are an Iroquoian-­speaking indigenous people of North America, their present-­day territory ranges from southern Quebec to eastern Ontario. Riel grew up in Fort Smith, a small town located in the South Slave region of the Northwest Territories. Fort Smith sits on the Slave River, and draws people from all over the world to kayak its world-­class rapids.

Amos Scott

Amos Scott

Executive Producer

    Amos Scott was born and raised in the North, and currently calls Yellowknife home. Amos is a proud Dene and member of the Tlicho Nation and
 his indigenous heritage has become a guiding force in his work. 

After a three-year stint traveling the North as a video-journalist and reporting for APTN National News, Amos became the producer and director of the documentary series, Dene A Journey.

 Amos is proud to be one of the founding members of Dene Nahjo (Nah-wo). Dene Nahjo is a new group of young northerners promoting innovation, expertise, and leadership to protect the Dene way of life for future generations.

    Riel Stevenson-Burke

    Riel Stevenson-Burke

    Lead Creative Editor

      Riel Stevenson-Burke is a Chipewyan-Cree traditional artist gone digital – attracted to the digital canvas and a passion to skateboard. Riel is a graduate of Vancouver Film School’s Digital Design program. He has free-lanced as a designer and motion graphics animator, produced storyboards and animatics, websites, title sequences, logo animations, and broadcast packages in Vancouver and Yellowknife. Riel has also worked as a freelance videographer. He currently works as the lead creative editor and camera-person for the APTN documentary reality documentary series Dene A Journey.